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CAIRO, EGYPT - NOVEMBER 1998: Children work under the watchful eye of their supervisor at a pottery factory in November, 1998 in Cairo, Egypt. Children as young as five years-old work in Cairo's pottery "factories", which are often nothing more than mud-brick hovels. Some of the children work with family members as a way to help the family business. They work hard for long hours in horrible working conditions but they are able to spend time with their fathers, uncles, brothers and sisters. These are the lucky ones. Other children are sent by their parents to work in the factories as a way to add to the household income. These children do not work with people who love them, but rather, they work for supervisors who are often cruel, threatening them with violence if they do not work fast enough. The children who work in Cairo's pottery factories work eight hours a day earning just US $1.50 per day. Many of the children would rather go to school, but because their families are so poor they must work. If they don't work and earn desperately needed money their families will often not be able to afford to put food on the table. They have little choice but to return to the factories day after day. (Photo by Matt Moyer/Getty Images)
Copyright
©1998 Matt Moyer
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7130x4650 / 31.5MB
Contained in galleries
Child Labor
CAIRO, EGYPT - NOVEMBER 1998: Children work under the watchful eye of their supervisor at a pottery factory in November, 1998 in Cairo, Egypt. Children as young as five years-old work in Cairo's pottery "factories", which are often nothing more than mud-brick hovels. Some of the children work with family members as a way to help the family business. They work hard for long hours in horrible working conditions but they are able to spend time with their fathers, uncles, brothers and sisters. These are the lucky ones. Other children are sent by their parents to work in the factories as a way to add to the household income. These children do not work with people who love them, but rather, they work for supervisors who are often cruel, threatening them with violence if they do not work fast enough. The children who work in Cairo's pottery factories work eight hours a day earning just US $1.50 per day. Many of the children would rather go to school, but because their families are so poor they must work. If they don't work and earn desperately needed money their families will often not be able to afford to put food on the table. They have little choice but to return to the factories day after day. (Photo by Matt Moyer/Getty Images)